Shatta wale

Shatta Movement boss Shatta Wale has been featured in one of Jamaican’s biggest selling newspaper. A big win for the artist and Africa at large.

It is clear Shatta wale is weighing in as the heavyweight champion of African Dance hall music, a title which has been on debate between his industry mate and fans.

Shatta Wale has continually been highlighted in some large papers in the Reggae/Dancehall cherishing nation.

His most recent one comes two days back. He was highlighted in The Gleaner paper.

Shatta Wale Revels In Being The King Of African Dancehall

The jury is still out on whether dancehall should crown a lord on each continent. In any case, Ghanaian reggae-dancehall performer and singer Charles Nii Armah Mensah Jr has strongly made a case for the title King of African Dancehall.

What’s more, as though to make sure about the crown solidly on his head, Shatta Wale, as he is prevalently known, discharged a melody titled Dancehall King, which, allegedly, prompted him winning the Artiste of the Year at the Ghana Music Awards in 2014. As anyone might expect, having accomplished street creds in Ghana from as far back as 2004, the pioneer of the Shatta Movement, who is currently positioned among the best artistes in his nation, has continually looked forward.

For Shatta Wale, dancehall is a way of life that he is so OK with that he is frequently confused with being a Jamaican. “Part of times when I am going through Airports individuals inquire as to whether I am Jamaican, and I let them know no, I’m Ghanaian,” the artiste with a major character and heaps of jokes disclosed to The Sunday Gleaner in a meeting from his home last Thursday.

The artiste, who rebranded himself when he dumped the moniker Bandana, has had an illicit relationship with Jamaican culture from he was a youngster. His dad would play reggae in the house and furthermore took him to the United Kingdom to meet his family members, who were half-Jamaican. That mostly clarifies his true sounding Jamaican pronunciation and his capacity to mix the Jamaican patois in pretty much the entirety of his tunes.

“At the point when I was in school, my motivations were King Shango, Sizzla, Culture, and CJ Lewis (British reggae artist),” Shatta shared. Yet, at that point he began tuning in to Buju Banton and Vybz Kartel and by one way or another dancehall came in.

“A few people in Africa think dancehall is full of disagreeableness and is brutal, yet I am here to show that it is simply melodious,” the artiste who has made history by turning into the first African act to feature a reggae-dancehall project expressed.

Produced by a group that incorporates Contractor Music Group, Golden Child Records, Beatbopper Records, and Kohanim Records, the project is titled Tropical House Cruises to Jamaica: The Reggae Collector’s Edition. It includes Capleton, Sizzla, Beenie Man, Elephant Man, Don Yute, and Mojo Morgan and furthermore includes Wayne Wonder, Singing Melody, Peetah Morgan, Tommy Lee Sparta, SkilliBeng, and Royce Da59.

“It’s an incredible chance and respect for me. Being the main act on the reggae collectors’ version of Tropical House Cruises to Jamaica is no easy thing. In any case, throughout the years, my work has represented itself with no issue.

At the point when I saw King Shango give me a shout-out recently, I felt extraordinary. Caribbean people grasp their African roots, and we are siblings. I’m anticipating to impact the world forever with everybody on the bill for this,” he expressed.

Be that as it may, the King of African Dancehall is no new to establishing musical records, one of which was thrown in stone a year ago when he was handled a collab with Queen Bey on her The Lion King: the Gift collection.

In a meeting with NBC, Beyoncé said she saw the album as a letter to Africa, and to give it that bona fide feel, she picked the best artistes from the continent. Shatta Wale snatched many features for his Beyoncé collab, titled Already, and which included Jamaican-American electronic move music trio Major Lazer.

Miracle
“One incredible supernatural occurrence that truly happened to my profession was getting that collaboration with Beyoncé. At the point when my management group informed me concerning it, I needed to inquire as to whether it was the real Beyoncé,” he disclosed to The Sunday Gleaner.

While he agree with the theory that says that American acts are connecting with African artistes for coordinated efforts to support their own ratings on the continent, Shatta revealed that Jay-Z and Beyoncé are as of now immensely famous in Africa. “I think that entire album was just about connecting with her home [ Africa } . Also, I additionally believe this is on the grounds that I’m cute,” he included cheekily.

Shatta wale

A four-time visitor to Jamaica, where he absorbed the genre, and everything helpful that came his direction, Shatta Wale has made sure about collabs with various dancehall artistes, among them Shawn Storm, Jah Vinci, Shenseea, and his daddy, Addi. Of Kartel, he expressed, “Goodness, I am his firstborn.

I follow him alone on IG.” Shatta Wale has 2.4 million followres on Instagram, and he is truly following just a single individual. His IG blurb states, ‘Child of Gaza King”, alongside a crown emoticon. It was his collab four years ago with Shawn Storm, Party Fi Life, that prompted the connection with the imprisoned Gaza leader.

They presently have a tune together, Mansa Musa Money, which is being touted as the greatest collabo throughout the entire existence of African dancehall music. Shatta Wale had intended to shoot the video in Dubai and South Africa, yet COVID-19 has placed that on hold.

“The COVID-19 has influenced us seriously. We can’t move about unreservedly, and here we have a time limit, which must be regarded. I trust this thing passes soon,” he said. In any case, meanwhile, he is occupied in his home studio and even sorted out an online show, Faith Concert, which expected to carry hope and courage to Ghanaians and his fans far and wide. Shatta Wale was additionally chosen by the Ministry of Communications, Ghana, as one of two feature artistes for the COVID-19 app launch concert show held in April.

Among his hit songs are Hol’It, which beat BBC Radio 1Xtra’s Afroboss Top 5 melodies graph; Kakai, which caused a ripple effect inside the African people in the United States and past and bested a few dancehall outlines universally; Wine Ya Waist, including Davido; and tunes discharged from his After the Storm album, for which he did a promotion US Tour in 2017.

His third album, Reign (2018), accomplished a record for a Ghanaian artist by showing up on the Billboard Top World Albums Chart, securing 6th spot.

The King of African Dancehall, who has a truckload of trophies which are demonstration of his strength in the field, is presently working on his 2020 album. It is titled Gift of Go

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